My Illlustrated Travel Journal with Essays about Roman and Mediaeval History and some Geology


11.9.05
  Pit House

A reconstructed pit house, also known as sunken house or Grubenhaus in the Palatine Museum Tilleda. Pit houses were built mostly into the earth with only the roof standing out. Those houses were not used for living, but for storage and as working places.

Pit house

The interior of this sunken house is the working place of a woodturner.

A woodturner's lathe

The museum sometimes has presentations of Medieaval crafts, but this woodturner was nowhere to be found, lol.




































 
Comments:
I love places like that, where you can actually see what these things looked like. Textbook pictures just don't come close :).
 
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The Lost Fort is a travel journal and history blog based on my travels in Germany, the UK, Scandinavia, and other places. It includes essays on Roman and Mediaeval history, as well as some geology, illustrated with photos of old castles and churches, Roman remains, and beautiful landscapes.

All texts (except comments by guests) and photos (if no other copyright is noted) on this blog are copyright of Gabriele Campbell.
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Location: Germany

I'm a blogger from Germany with a MA in Literature and History which doesn't pay my bills, so I use it to research blogposts instead. I'm interested in everything Roman and Mediaeval, avid reader and sometimes writer, opera enthusiast, traveller with a liking for foreign languages and odd rocks, photographer, and tea aficionado. And an old-fashioned blogger who hasn't yet gotten an Instagram account. :-)


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