Roman and Mediaeval History, Illlustrated Travel Journals, Mediaeval Literature, Geology


31.10.14
  More Castles for the Collection

The weather was unfortunately not very cooperative; overcast sky at best, often with mist, drizzle or downright rain. So you'll get some autumn photos that'll make you want to sit inside with a nice hot tea.

Iburg (Bad Driburg), remains of the chapel

Not much remains of the Iburg today, but there was a Saxon hillfort already in the 8th century, which Charlemagne conquered. He had a chapel built there and gifted the place to the bishop of Paderborn. In 1189, bishop Bernhard II built a castle around the chapel (which he expanded), using some of the old wall and trench structures. The castle was destroyed by Otto of Braunschweig in 1444.

Falkenburg, inner curtain wall seen from the outer bailey

The Falkenburg was built by Bernhard II of Lippe in 1194 and would remain their main seat and centre of their power until the mid-15th century. The castle withstood several sieges, until it was severely damaged in 1453 due to a fire accident. The castle was abandoned soon thereafter and used as quarry. Its history ties in with some of my other posts, like the one about Castle Polle.

Falkenburg, buildings in the inner bailey

The Falkenburg is closed to the public because of extensive archaeological and reconstruction work going on since 2004. But since we already had climbed the damn hill - in the rain to boot - my father decided to ignore the verboten signs and we managed a way through the fences to get some photos. In the end, we had a lot of fun despite the rain, feeling like naughty children. And we even got supper later. *grin*

Castle Lippspringe with the Lippe springs

The moated castle Lippspringe was first mentioned in 1312 as in possession of the Cathedral Chapter of Paderborn. It was refortified in 1482, but badly damaged during the Thiry Years War. Today, only the walls of one house and some curtain walls remain; a conference centre has been built into the remains, merging ruins with modern architecture.

Castle Dringenberg, main gate

Bernhard V of Lippe bought the county of Dringen from the counts of Everstein in 1316 and had a castle built on the mountain spur. It was expanded in the 15th century; the gatehouse and the tower were added in 1488. The castle was destroyed during the Thirty Years War but rebuilt by Prince Bishop Adolph of Paderborn. It served as summer residence of the bishops of Paderborn until the 19th century. Dringenberg shows a mix of Renaissance and recontructed older elements.

Castle Dringenberg, inner courtyard

There is a charming museum in several rooms of the castle these days, showing old furniture, an old store, things like mechanical writing machines, and geological finds. Also worth a visit are the vaulted cellars, the oldest remaining part of the castle.

The famous Externsteine formation

The Externsteine formation is not a castle, of course, but it fits best in this post. The sandstone outcropping is several hundred metres long and 37,5 metres (123 ft.) at its highest point. The rocks have been altered by humans over time; caves were hewn out, and at one place a beautiful Medieaval relief has been carved into the surface.

Another view of the Externsteine in the rain

We don't know for sure if the Externsteine played a role in the religious life of the Germanic tribes in pre-Christian times, but the caves were used a chapel in the Middle Ages. Later, a count of Lippe erected a platform on one of the peaks and used some of the pillars as part of a curtain wall of a small castle, but those structures - except for the platform and staircase - no longer exist. Since the rocks were wet and the view clouded, I didn't climb them.
 
Comments:
I absolutely love Castle Dringenberg. Both the main gate and the inner yard are beautiful. Seems like you had a great time during your trip, despite the "naughty" weather ;-) All the best!
 
Really beautyfull stones from my homeland. Dringenberg we sometimes visiting for concerts or readings.

I told you, that Falkenburg is on a damned hill :-D. We have visited it without a tour and ignored the fences too.

Did you read my post about the holy grail and Externsteine? Believe me, I will open your eyes.....

http://altesteine.blogspot.de/2012/10/omg-der-heilige-gral-ist-in-den.html

*LOL!*
 
Thank you, Kasia. Yep, we got rainproof hiking clothes, so it wasn't too bad. Only the raindrop on the camera lens were annyoing.

Maegwyn, a hill yes, but that was indeed a damned hill. :-) I got a booklet about the Externsteine which includes a chapter about the Nazi time. I'm not surprised about the Holy Grail being located there; more about the Nazis running after some French mythological thingie. ;-)
 
Castle Lippspringe and Castle Dringenberg look rather cosy. I don't feel inclined to storm them at all. :)
 
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The Lost Fort is a blog based on my travels in Germany, the UK and other places, with essays on Roman and Mediaeval history illustrated with lots of photos of old castles, cathedrals, Roman remains, and beautiful landscapes. You may also find the odd essay about geology or Mediaeval literature.

All texts (except comments by guests) and photos (if no other copyright is noted) on this blog are copyright of Gabriele Campbell.

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Location: Germany

I'm a blogger from Germany with a MA in Literature and History which doesn't pay my bills, so I use it to research blogposts instead. I'm interested in everything Roman and Mediaeval, avid reader and sometimes writer, opera enthusiast, traveller with a liking for foreign languages and odd rocks, photographer, and tea aficionado. And an old-fashioned blogger who hasn't yet gotten an Instagram account. :-)


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